Top Myths Associated With Drinking Tea

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There are many misconceptions associated with tea. Luckily, this wonderful drink is unarguably healthy and a marvelous alternative to soft drinks. Therefore, any misconstrued facts are unlikely to lead to health problems. However, the top myths associated with drinking tea can introduce disappointments and dejected feelings from people expecting more significant results and health benefits, which may turn them towards the more enjoyable, flavorful drink options, such as soda, that contain very unhealthy sugar levels and nasty chemicals.

Some Of The Top Myths Associated With Drinking Tea

One of the most significant misconceptions is the word “tea.” Many drinks have this label that really should not because the word contains some initial impressions that may not be completely truthful. The only beverages that should have this association are the ones made with the Camellia sinensis plant, including Black, Green, and Oolong. Herbal, Rooibos, and other variations are not technically within this category considering they are made with other plants, such as flowers, herbs, and leaves. The differences between the types containing the correct plant are created mainly through the processing step by fermentation, oxidation, and packaging.

Another slight untruth is the impression that the studies are conclusively supportive of the claims of disease prevention and cancer reduction. While there are significant numbers of scientific research and historical background that do support these claims, many others suggest otherwise. These disagreements are apparent with almost every scientific claim, so every source is not necessarily credible considering many have certain side agendas. However, this does prevent certain results of drinking this healthy beverage from being labeled conclusively proven. Additionally, most research is conducted through animal studies, and animal bodily functions and reactions do not always align with that of a human body.

Finally, the amount of caffeine is another one of the top myths associated with tea drinking. Some people think it is comparable to coffee, and others may believe it is essentially nonexistent. Both of these statements are completely inaccurate, but the truth is that every type has a similar amount of caffeine. For comparison, coffee contains about 95 mg of caffeine per cup (8 ounces), and black tea is roughly 47 mg per cup. This is roughly half the amount of coffee, and the recommended intake is no more than 400 mg. Using some basic calculations, we can determine that more than eight cups can be consumed versus the four cups of coffee. Additionally, tea offers many more health benefits than the alternatives.

In conclusion, the top myths associated with tea drinking are the labeling of each type, the scientific proof behind the health claims, and the level of caffeine. While no problems are associated with the consumption of these flavorful drinks, the level of benefits may not live up to the expectations of some individuals. Therefore, it is important to clarify any big misconceptions that could deject people and turn them towards significantly less healthy, sugary options, such as coffee or soft drinks.

Photo by jjeff


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